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Spiders

Most Arachnids (Spiders & Scorpions) are nocturnal. They are rarely seen during the day unless they are disturbed from their natural environment.

 

Spiders become active as the daylight begins to fade. They leave the safety and protection of their burrows and go out in search of food. Web spinning spiders construct webs to snare their prey. As day breaks spiders generally retreat to their burrows.

Some Tasmanian species of spiders do pose a medical threat to humans and pets. If you are noticing an increase in spider activity at your home it is in your best interest to implement a pest control plan

 

Contact Core Pest Solutions on 0449 722 819 or online to discuss a plan to control spiders in your home or business

BLACK HOUSE SPIDER

Description:

 

Large abdomen. Fangs are not obvious but move pincer wise. Dark brown to black. Legs often black.


Female 15 – 18mm. Male 8 – 10mm. Toxic and produces pain, nausea and sweating.

Habits:

Makes a felted web at the centre of which is a tunnel. In sheds, toilets, windows and under guttering. Not aggressive.

HUNTSMAN

 

Description:

 

First 2 pairs of legs longer than rear 2. Flattened and hairy. Male slightly smaller with enlarged palps. Buff, dark patches on cephalothorax and abdomen.

 

Female 35 – 40mm. Male 15 – 25mm.
Not toxic. Bites may be painful but are rare

 

Habits:

 

Lives under bark during daytime and emerges at night. Often enters houses. Useful as it feeds on other insects. Not aggressive

WHITETAIL SPIDER

Description:

Cigar shaped body. Cephalothorax oval. Grey to black with a white mark on the end of the abdomen.

Female 12 – 15mm. Male 5 – 8mm. Bites cause local pain and blistering.

Habits:

Found under bark of trees and in bathrooms. Not aggressive

RED BACK SPIDER

Description:

Long legs, large bulbous abdomen. Small cephalothorax. Male very small. Black with a velvety red stripe on dorsal surface however this may be missing on some. Pale area on ventral surface.


Female 12 – 15mm, male 3 – 4mm. Very toxic. Male does not bite.

Habits:

Makes a loose web in rubbish, unsewered toilets, under houses. Most bites on male genitals. Not aggressive

FUNNEL WEB SPIDER

Description:

Shiny cephalothorax. Spinnerets long. Terminal segment longest. Spur on second pair of legs.


Black with fine reddish hairs. 25 - 30mm long. Very toxic

Habits:

Favors moist dark situations. Long silken tube through litter on or in the ground. Active during late summer and autumn.
Aggressive

WOLF SPIDER

Description:

Posterior eyes large and mounted in square on front of cephalothorax. Male is leggy. Mottled grey and Brown. Union Jack appearance on cephalothorax. Carries young on its back.

 

15 - 25mm long. May be toxic and painful for a short time

Habits:

Inhabits gardens, making holes in ground covered by litter. Moves very rapidly when disturbed. Not aggressive.

MOUSE SPIDER

Description:

Enlarged cephalothorax. Base of fangs enlarged. Eyes on front of cephalothorax. Male: long legs, palps only slightly swollen. Has red cephalothorax and basal parts of fangs. Female: short legs, black with
reddish hairs.

 

Male 12 – 18mm.. Female 20– 25mm. Toxic with painful bite

Habits:

Female lives in holes in the ground. Holes may be quite extensive. Male roams in search of female. Not aggressive.

ST ANDREW'S CROSS SPIDER

Description:

Long legs, small cephalothorax. Male smaller and paler than female. Brown cephalothorax, abdomen striped yellow and brown.

 

Female 10 – 15mm. Male 5 – 6mm. Not toxic

Habits:

Orb web. Hangs in web with legs in the shape of a cross. Not aggressive

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